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The smell of terroir

Our nose abilities are greater than we expected. In fact, our olfactory system allows us to distinguish two wines differing for grape variety and, even, for production geographical area, a feature defined terroir by experts. This is the evidence emerged from a new research, published in the journal Food quality and preference, carried out at SISSA by Francesco Foroni, now at the Australian Catholic University, together with other scientists led by SISSA neuroscientist Raffaella Rumiati and the collaboration of the University of Padua.

Symposium on "Physico-Mathematical Methods for Complex Data"

 10-01-2017 “Physico-mathematical methods for complex data”: this is the title of the symposium that will be held at SISSA on 13 January 2017. Riccardo Zecchina of the Politecnico di Torino will open the meeting with a talk on neural networks architectures. Antonietta Mira of the Università della Svizzera Italiana will discuss a methodology for statistical inference in complex models. The symposium will be closed by Yonatan Loewenstein of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, with a talk on the computational modeling of operant learning.

 

 

Premio di Confindustria a una tesi di laurea in matematica UNITS-SISSA

Luca Venturi, che ha conseguito una laurea specialistica in matematica UNITS-SISSA (laurea triennale in matematica presso università degli studi di Pavia), il 21 dicembre 2016 riceverà, presso la sede di Confindustria Pavia, il premio di Laurea per la sua tesi di laurea magistrale discussa all’Università di Trieste il 14 luglio 2016 dal titolo “Weighted reduced order methods for parametrized PDEs in Uncertainty Quantification problems”.

Double effort against Rett’s syndrome

Although our genes normally come in pairs (one on each homologous chromosome), sometimes one of them is missing and the “surviving” one is unable to do all the work (it is referred as "haploinsufficient"): this situation can give rise to very serious diseases. So what can be done to fight these, often neurological, diseases? One possible strategy has been successfully adopted by a SISSA research team, in vitro and  in vivo: using leading-edge techniques to stimulate the surviving gene to also do the work of the missing gene.

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