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Conferences

Amazing crystalline helium

Sébastien Balibar

21 May 2014, 2.30 pm

SISSA – Main Lecture Hall

When looking for an answer to a problem we may come across a very different solution from what we expected and end up discovering new phenomena and expanding scientific knowledge.

That's what happened to Sébastien Balibar, director of research at the Statistical Physics Laboratory of the École Normale Supérieure of Paris, who was looking for a supersolid when he found "giant" plasticity. Balibar will tell us about these discoveries at the next SISSA colloquium, on May 21 at 2.30 pm.

All about prions

26 May, 5.30 pm

Revoltella Museum

via Diaz, 27, Trieste

Prion diseases are a class of encephalopathies that have very severe symptoms. The PRION conference, for the past 10 years the main meeting place for the world's leading experts in these neurodegenerative diseases, is being held in Trieste this year.

Bats use maps

Nachum Ulanovsky

March 31, 2014 - 12 am

SISSA, Main Lecture Hall

Via Bonomea, 265 - Trieste

Studying the echolocation mechanisms of bats, scientists have discovered how two- and three-dimensional spatial maps are formed in their brain.

Second thoughts on the second law

Elliot Lieb

June 17, 2014 - 3 pm

SISSA, Main Lecture Hall

Via Bonomea, 265 - Trieste

A public lecture at SISSA provides Elliott Lieb, professor of Mathematics and Physics at Princeton University, the opportunity to review the foundations of the second law of thermodynamics.

This is the physical law which introduces the concept of entropy of the Universe and establishes the direction of the flow of time. Lieb will offer the public his innovative point of view on this fundamental principle.

Neanderthal in high definition

Claudio Tuniz

September 18th, 2013 at 4.00 pm

SISSA, Main Lecture Hall

Paleoanthropology in the last years has been going through an exceptional transformation that has allowed to make amazing discoveries (like, for instance, that Homo sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis in ancient times underwent hybridization), and will enable many more in the future.

The chromosome geographer

Thomas Cremer

October 23rd 2013, at 2.30 pm

SISSA, Main Lecture Hall

Among the most interesting discoveries in recent decades, the one that cellular DNA does not appear as a shapeless tangle, but rather is arranged into discrete "geographic" territories may be considered truly revolutionary. The first to suggest these chromosome "maps" was Thomas Cremer, a scientist whose studies represent a milestone in the fields of biology and genetics. Cremer gave a public lecture at SISSA, on Wednesday October 23.

A look at the infinitely small

Stefan Hell

December 19, 2013 - 11 am

SISSA, Main Lecture Hall

Via Bonomea, 265 - Trieste

Until a short time ago scientists thought it was impossible to observe objects smaller than 200 nanometres under an optical microscope. Stefan Hell, a physicist of the Max Plank Institute, found a way to overcome this limit, inventing a method to observe biological tissues down to the molecular scale. The physicist talked about his research at a public conference at SISSA. 

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