News & Events

Amazing crystalline helium

Sébastien Balibar

21 May 2014, 2.30 pm

SISSA – Main Lecture Hall

When looking for an answer to a problem we may come across a very different solution from what we expected and end up discovering new phenomena and expanding scientific knowledge.

That's what happened to Sébastien Balibar, director of research at the Statistical Physics Laboratory of the École Normale Supérieure of Paris, who was looking for a supersolid when he found "giant" plasticity. Balibar will tell us about these discoveries at the next SISSA colloquium, on May 21 at 2.30 pm.

The “rings” of the ribosome

Loren Williams

19 May 2014, 11.00 am

SISSA – Room 128

Via Bonomea 265, Trieste

Mapping the history of life by "peeling back" the layers of ribosome as if they were growth rings of a tree. This is the research focus of Loren Williams, a biologist from Georgia Tech (USA), who will be explaining his latest findings at a public lecture at SISSA.

In search of the origins of the Universe

One of the major challenges of astrophysics today is to trace the origin and earliest development of the Universe. Planck is one of the most important missions in this respect. Today about one hundred scientists are busy analyzing the picture of fossil radiation "taken" by the ESA Planck satellite.

Many of these researchers will be meeting on May 12 at SISSA in Trieste for the "Planck Joint Core Team" conference, to assess what has been discovered so far. The conference is organized by SISSA and INAF-OATS.

SISSA dedicates its Main Lecture Hall to Paolo Budinich

On May 6, the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste will be paying tribute to the physicist and SISSA founder Paolo Budinich, who died last November, by dedicating the School's Main Lecture Hall to him. The ceremony will take place at 12 noon.

Liquid spacetime

If spacetime were a fluid, it would have very low viscosity, just like a "superfluid". A study carried out jointly by the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste and the Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich shows how the "atoms" making up the fluid of spacetime should behave, according to models of quantum gravity.

A “SMART” spectrometer

Vincenzo Barone

8 May 2014, 3pm

SISSA, Main Lecture Hall

Via Bonomea 265 - Trieste

In order to study complex systems and compare the work of those who carry out empirical observations and those who do research using simulations we need new instruments.

At the origin of cell division

Movement and the ability to divide are two fundamental traits of living cells. The origin of these abilities could rely on very simple physical mechanisms, which have been simulated by scientists of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste in a study just published in Physical Review Letters.

Second thoughts on the second law

Elliot Lieb

June 17, 2014 - 3 pm

SISSA, Main Lecture Hall

Via Bonomea, 265 - Trieste

A public lecture at SISSA provides Elliott Lieb, professor of Mathematics and Physics at Princeton University, the opportunity to review the foundations of the second law of thermodynamics.

This is the physical law which introduces the concept of entropy of the Universe and establishes the direction of the flow of time. Lieb will offer the public his innovative point of view on this fundamental principle.

Technical tests of biodiversity

A team of physicists from SISSA and the Polytechnic University of Turin has developed and analysed a model that simulates the effect of migration on the genetic biodiversity of populations, and discovered that the effect is all but trivial.

DOWNLOAD > Press release

NGF and stress

Enrico Alleva

April 9, 2014 - 3 pm

SISSA, Main Lecture Hall

Via Bonomea, 265 - Trieste

Universal syllables

Languages are learned, it's true, but are there also innate bases in the structure of language that precede experience? Linguists have noticed that, despite the huge variability of human languages, there are some preferences in the sound of words that can be found across languages.

So they wonder whether this reflects the existence of a universal, innate biological basis of language. A SISSA study provides evidence to support to this hypothesis, demonstrating that certain preferences in the sound of words are already active in newborn infants.

One gene, many tissues

A map of how genes vary in biological tissues: a huge project that required the collaboration of dozens of laboratories worldwide, including the Neurogenomics Laboratory of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste.

This is the result of a study just published in Nature by the FANTOM consortium (and signed by over two hundred authors). It is only the first of a series of more specific papers that will focus on how the single genes work in each type of tissue.

Simple, like a neutron star

For astrophysicists neutron stars are extremely complex astronomical objects. Research conducted with the collaboration of SISSA and published in the journal Physical Review Letters demonstrates that in certain respects these stars can instead be described very simply and that they show similarities with black holes.

DOWNLOAD > Press release

Like being inside a star

What happens to hydrogen when it is subjected to the same pressures as reached inside a planet? Scientists from SISSA simulated this situation to verify if and when hydrogen becomes "metallic". The paper has been published in the journal Nature Communications.

DOWNLOAD > Press release

It looks like rubber but isn’t

Researchers at SISSA are developing fast and efficient numerical methods to study the behaviour of molecules and materials. The latest work by Angelo Rosa, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, simulated the behaviour of concentrated solutions of "circular" polymers, providing a far more accurate description of the behaviour of these materials than available in the past.

(Not too) few but capable

Small changes in a population may lead to dramatic consequences, like the disappearance of the migratory route of a species. A study carried out in collaboration with the SISSA has created a model of the behaviour of a group of individuals on the move (like a school of fish, a herd of sheep or a flock of birds, etc.) which, by changing a few simple parameters, reproduces the collective behaviour patterns observed in the wild.

Male, stressed, and poorly social

Stressed males tend to become more self-centred and less able to distinguish their own emotions and intentions from those of other people. For women the exact opposite is true. This is the main finding of a study just published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, carried out with the collaboration of SISSA in Trieste.

DOWNLOAD > Press release

Bats use maps

Nachum Ulanovsky

March 31, 2014 - 12 am

SISSA, Main Lecture Hall

Via Bonomea, 265 - Trieste

Studying the echolocation mechanisms of bats, scientists have discovered how two- and three-dimensional spatial maps are formed in their brain.

String Field Theory

SFT2014 Conference

July 28 - August 1,2014

SISSA - Room 128

Via Bonomea 265, Trieste

The conference was devoted to the latest results in SFT as well as in related fields, such as higher spin theories and double field theory. It was the sixth in the series.

For more information > CLICK HERE


Previous SFT conferences:

SCoNE 2014

July 21- August 1, 2014

SISSA, Big Meeting Room (7th floor)

Via Bonomea 265, Trieste

Social Cognitive Neuroscience is an emerging field with an interdisciplinary vision on human behavior in a social context. This perspective, built on the confluence of neurological, cognitive, and social sciences, addresses fundamental questions about the interaction between the mind/brain and the social world.

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