Research

Laser beams for superconductivity

A laser pulse, a special material, an extraordinary property which appears inexplicably. These are the main elements that emerge from a research conducted by an international team, coordinated by Michele Fabrizio and comprising Andrea Nava and Erio Tosatti from SISSA, Claudio Giannetti from the Università Cattolica di Brescia and Antoine Georges of from the Collège de France. The results of their study have recently been published in the journal Nature Physics.

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The nose reveals our relationship with emotions

Do you express your emotions? Are you able to name them, talk about them, relate to your feelings? If your answer is not an unqualified yes, you might be among the 10 percent of the healthy population who has difficulty processing the emotions they experience: a psychological condition known as alexithymia. An alexithymic individual has difficulty, to a greater or lesser degree, in relating to the sensations – ranging from joy to fear, from disgust to anger – which make up our experience.

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Rett Syndrome: a new therapeutic project

A novel research path for a rare variant of Rett Syndrome might turn into therapy for several other neurological pathologies. This is what is hoped for by the project of the Cerebral Cortex Development Lab of Trieste’s SISSA, recent winner of a funding provided by the Jerome Lejeune Foundation, a French institution engaged, among other things, in supporting research on Rett Syndrome.

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Parkinson’s and prion diseases: a link discovered

Parkinson’s disease and prion diseases are very different from each other as regards both origins and course.

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Exchanges of identity in deep space

Like in a nail-biting thriller full of escapes and subterfuge, photons from far-off light sources, such as blazars, could go up against a continuous exchange of identity in their journey through the Universe.

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How to move objects at the nanoscale

To move a nanoparticle on the surface of a graphene sheet, you won’t need a “nano-arm”: by applying a temperature difference at the ends of the membrane, the nanocluster laying on it will drift from the hot region to the cold one. In addition, contrary to the laws ruling the world at the macroscale, the force acting on the particle – the so-called thermophoretic force – should not decrease as the sheet length rises, sporting a so-called ballistic behavior.

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Shedding light on Galaxies’ rotation secrets

The dichotomy concerns the so-called angular momentum (per unit mass), that in physics is a measure of size and rotation velocity. Spiral galaxies are found to be strongly rotating, with an angular momentum higher by a factor of about 5 than ellipticals. What is the origin of such a difference? An international research team investigated the issue in a study just published in The Astrophysical Journal. The team was led by SISSA Ph.D.

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Laser Pulses Reveal Superconductors of the Future

Another step forward towards superconductivity at room temperature: an experiment at the cutting edge of condensed matter physics and materials science has revealed that the dream of more efficient energy usage can turn into reality. An international collaboration, led by the scientists of Italy’s International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Università Cattolica di Brescia and Politecnico di Milano used suitably tailored laser pulses to snap the electronic interactions in a compound containing copper, oxygen and bismuth.

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It's the thought that counts

A sports person who has accidentally caused serious injury to a rival. A distracted driver who has caused an accident. Or a colleague who has involuntarily made a very serious error. Even outside the court room we have all been in situations in which we have had to express judgements on specific events on the basis of the seriousness of the incident but also on the intentions of those who caused them.

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It is easier for a DNA knot…

Anyone who has been on a sailing boat knows that tying a knot is the best way to secure a rope to a hook and prevent its slippage. The same applies to sewing threads where knots are introduced to prevent them slipping through two pieces of fabric. How, then, can long DNA filaments, which have convoluted and highly knotted structure, manage to pass through the tiny pores of various biological systems?

A cura dell'Ufficio Stampa

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