Skip to content Skip to navigation

News

At the origin of cell division

Movement and the ability to divide are two fundamental traits of living cells. The origin of these abilities could rely on very simple physical mechanisms, which have been simulated by scientists of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste in a study just published in Physical Review Letters.

One gene, many tissues

A map of how genes vary in biological tissues: a huge project that required the collaboration of dozens of laboratories worldwide, including the Neurogenomics Laboratory of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste.

This is the result of a study just published in Nature by the FANTOM consortium (and signed by over two hundred authors). It is only the first of a series of more specific papers that will focus on how the single genes work in each type of tissue.

It looks like rubber but isn’t

Researchers at SISSA are developing fast and efficient numerical methods to study the behaviour of molecules and materials. The latest work by Angelo Rosa, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, simulated the behaviour of concentrated solutions of "circular" polymers, providing a far more accurate description of the behaviour of these materials than available in the past.

(Not too) few but capable

Small changes in a population may lead to dramatic consequences, like the disappearance of the migratory route of a species. A study carried out in collaboration with the SISSA has created a model of the behaviour of a group of individuals on the move (like a school of fish, a herd of sheep or a flock of birds, etc.) which, by changing a few simple parameters, reproduces the collective behaviour patterns observed in the wild.

Pages