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SISSA SUMMER FESTIVAL 2017

SISSA amphitheater is ready to host a series of beautiful events that will merge art and science in a unique environment. With six different events planned from 26 May to 14 July, SISSA SUMMER FESTIVAL will offer the opportunity to listen the musicians from Giuseppe Tartini conservatory and attend actress Diana Hobel’s play entitled “Paolo Budinich and the Paradox of the Adventure”. In the program, world folk and tzigane music concert performed by an orchestra of 40 children led by the conductor Martin Schaefer and the show “Lab rats” by Teatro Miela.

Top employment rate for MCS

Former students of SISSA professional Master’s course in Science Communications “Franco Prattico” (MCS) have an employment rate that approaches 100%. A recent survey by the independent research institute Ixé shows that 95% of them are employed, 60% are working in science communication. Among the many job opportunities offered by MCS, 42% of those employed in science communication works in science journalism, 31% in institutional communication, 30% in publishing and 21,5% in training and education (some are working in more areas at the same time).

Towards better therapies to fight breast cancer

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women in Italy and in the world. Today, however, it seems possible to design more selective and effective drugs through numerical simulations. This is what has been revealed by research carried out by the “Istituto Officina dei Materiali” (IOM) of the Italian National Research Council (CNR) in Trieste and the International School for Advances Studies (SISSA), in collaboration with the Bellinzona Institute for Research in Biomedicine and the University of Italian Switzerland.

SISSA at the top of Italian research

The Physics and Mathematics areas of the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste are among the best 350 departments in the Italian university system. As a result of this ranking, they will have access to the funding of 180 departments with almost 300 million euros beginning in 2018. The ranking was compiled on the basis of the evaluation of research quality (VQR) released by ANVUR – the National Agency for the Evaluation of the University and Research Systems.

Fast track from Master to PhD in Condensed Matter

A unique opportunity for everybody with a passion for research. SISSA offers 2 fellowships in the framework of an "Advanced Training Programme" leading to a fast track PhD in connection with the Inter-University Master course in Physics jointly delivered by the Universities of Trieste and Udine. The program lasts 2 years and is aimed to candidates who wish to acquire theoretical tools and necessary skills to start a high level research activity in Theory and Numerical Simulation of Condensed Matter Physics. Application will be accepted from 12 May to 20 July 2017.

Laser Pulses Reveal Superconductors of the Future

Another step forward towards superconductivity at room temperature: an experiment at the cutting edge of condensed matter physics and materials science has revealed that the dream of more efficient energy usage can turn into reality. An international collaboration, led by the scientists of Italy’s International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Università Cattolica di Brescia and Politecnico di Milano used suitably tailored laser pulses to snap the electronic interactions in a compound containing copper, oxygen and bismuth.

Pint of Science 2017

Astronomy, technology, seismology, climate, genetics and nanotechnology in local pubs: Pint of Science is coming to Trieste from May 15th to May 17th. An event for science lovers, for those who want to find out what’s going on within the many research centers in town, for curious people as well as for those who simply want to drink a good pint while talking about science. Founded five years ago in the UK, Pint of Science will take place this year in 11 countries worldwide.

In Trieste four pubs will host some brilliant scientists to discuss their latest research and findings.

“If I knew how to take a good pic, I would always do it”

“If I knew how to take a good picture, I would always do it” is a series of seminars organized by Andrea Tomicich and Giuseppe Mussardo at SISSA. From 18th May to 15th June 2017, every Thursday the speakers will lead the audience into a fascinating world that will merge the story of great photographers, and their memorable pictures, with the history of this beautiful art form. The first seminar is entitled “Flash of lights. The first great photographers” and is scheduled for Thursday 18 May.

Vaccines: fighting prejudices through information

Vaccine communication is a complicated affair. On the one hand, the risk of oversimplification or making mistakes is always present; on the other, communicators, politicians, doctors and scientists have to face increasing skepticism on this issue. On Wednesday 10 May, a seminar organized by the Master course in Science Communication “Franco Prattico” will offer an interesting opportunity to discuss this critical topic. In the first part, Professor Andrea Grignolio, from the University of Rome "La Sapienza", will present the theme focusing on a historical perspective.

Reducing the gender gap in science and technology

SAGA (a global UNESCO project with the support of Sida) aims to contribute to improving the situation of women and reducing the gender gap in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields in all countries at all levels of education and research. A distinguishing feature of SAGA is its focus on data. Some of its core methodologies are determination, measurement and assessesment of sex-disaggregated data.

It's the thought that counts

A sports person who has accidentally caused serious injury to a rival. A distracted driver who has caused an accident. Or a colleague who has involuntarily made a very serious error. Even outside the court room we have all been in situations in which we have had to express judgements on specific events on the basis of the seriousness of the incident but also on the intentions of those who caused them.

An innovative model for the study of vision

New approaches to the study of vision both from the neurobiological perspective and with a view to the technological development of artificial vision systems: that is the key result of the research project led by the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste in collaboration with the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT) in Rovereto and published in the science journal eLife.

Collective movements in animal groups

Collective changes in biological groups require all individuals in the group to go through a behavioral change of state. Sometimes these changes are triggered by external perturbations, as in evasive maneuvers of animal groups under predatory attacks. Often, however, they occur spontaneously and are only due to internal behavioral fluctuations. In all cases, the efficiency of information transport is a key factor to prevent cohesion loss and preserve collective robustness.

Gender-based violence: when words count

According to Istat, almost 7 million women in Italy are mistreated by their partners in the course of their life. Every year, more than 100 women are killed by someone they once trusted. More and more often journalist are asked to tell these tragic stories. In this sensitive context, the word choice is of great importance as it may help to bring about cultural change that would ensure that the most vulnerable members of society, like women, old people and children, are protected and respected.

Scienza e Virgola

From synthetic life to the chemistry of beauty, from the myth of the Ancient Astronauts to the latest genome editing techniques, from the wonders of botany to the science of sex. Scientific research will be on stage during the second edition of Scienza e Virgola, a series of book presentations organized by the Masters’ course in Science Communication "Franco Prattico" of the Interdisciplinary Laboratory of SISSA, the International School for Advanced Studies in Trieste.

Through a series of ten meetings with the authors, free and open to the public, we will discover some of the most interesting science books published in Italy over the last months. All events will be held in Italian.

It is easier for a DNA knot…

Anyone who has been on a sailing boat knows that tying a knot is the best way to secure a rope to a hook and prevent its slippage. The same applies to sewing threads where knots are introduced to prevent them slipping through two pieces of fabric. How, then, can long DNA filaments, which have convoluted and highly knotted structure, manage to pass through the tiny pores of various biological systems?

Looking for signs of the Big Bang

The silence of an immense desolate land in which to search for reverberations coming from the time at which everything began. The Simons Observatory will be built in the Chilean Atacama desert at an altitude of several thousand meters for the purposes of studying primordial gravitational waves which originated in the first instants of the Big Bang. The SISSA research group led by Carlo Baccigalupi and Francesca Perrotta will take part in this prestigious international project which will lead to the realization  of an ultra-modern telescope project.

Johannes Kepler, a puzzling modernity

On Wednesday 22 March 2017 the historian of physics Anna Maria Lombardi will give a seminar dedicated to the German astronomer Johannes Kepler. Kepler’s laws are encompassed by the laws of classical mechanics established by Newton in 1687. But they were discovered almost 80 years before, in a dramatically different context, in which the German astronomer could rely neither on appropriate maths or physics, nor on what we call nowadays “scientific method”. How could he succeed in finding his astronomical laws?